Posts on Four Genre of Creative Arts that Share a Theme

tl;dr: A related group of posts discusses aspects of a theme shared by a poem, impressionist painting, movie, and classic rock song.

Art Reveals Themes. Creative arts, such as poems and paintings, tell small stories. Though they may offer only glimpses or vignettes of life, those mini-stories harbor what I call “themes.” For example, a rock ’n’ roll band sings about two lovers and shares with the listener themes of happiness, a car, mistrust, wedding bells, or a range of other themes of our culture.

Themes Suggest Subthemes. Moreover…

My previous nine articles have each focused on a different finding from an ever-growing set of blog posts that use R to investigate Covid-19 data. The links to those articles appear at the end of my most recent one, on the geographic focus of the posts.

For this article, I categorized each blog according to its web host site. For example, some of the hosts are sites maintained by a company, such as Grattan, or university, such as the University of Melbourne, where employees contribute the blog content. Those I categorize as “Organization”sites.

Other posts are published on a blog…

Geographic Focus on Blog Posts that Use R to Analyze Covid19 Data

In eight previous articles, I have analyzed different aspects of hundreds of blog posts that analyze Covid-19 data using the R programming language (“CovidRposts”). URLs for my articles are listed at the end of this article. If any reader would like to see the code I used or obtain the CovidRposts data, please write me at Rees(at)ReesMorrison(dot)com.

As I read the 242 CovidRposts found by me as of early September, I coded them for the country of their data. For example, posts that addressed the data of a…

To help the covid19 research community and R bloggers who contribute to it, I have been collecting blog posts that combine R programming and coronavirus data (“CovidRposts”). URLs for the seven previous articles are listed at the end of this one. My goal from the beginning was to spread the knowledge of programming tools, data sources and mathematical techniques. Another line of inquiry aims to help the R community find like-minded bloggers, whether by the work role of the bloggers and their countries, particularly the prolific contributors, or the topic of their posts. Of late, I have realized that my…

Continuing my series on blog posts that combine COVID-19 data and R , this piece looks at the length of the posts. The length of a blog post, as measured by the number of characters in it, gives an indication of how deeply into a topic the post delves. Someone looking for guidance and ideas might plausibly assume that the more words the blogger writes about a topic , the better the post explores the topic. If a post explains the data sources it uses or sophisticated mathematical techniques, even more length would be expected .

Let’s look at the…

This article continues my analysis of blog posts that use R to explore COVID-19 data. The five previous articles in the series address the timing of posts, the roles of the posters and their countries; the R packages employed; the data sources and math tools used; the topics written about; and the R and COVID-19 terms used.

For this sixth article, which is based on 215 posts collected so far, let’s look at the timing of prolific posters. During January and February 2020, news was seeping out about the novel coronavirus, but quantitative data about positive cases and deaths were…

Summary: In a collection of blog posts that use R code and refer to COVID-19, the percentages of words in the posts for related terms don’t yield clear insights — but the direction of the text mining effort may have promise.

This article aims to expand the analysis of blog posts that use R to explore COVID19 data. Previous articles address the timing of posts since February , the R packages employed, the math used, as well as he countries of the bloggers and their work roles.

With 205 posts collected so far, this article draws on text-mining tools to…

Blog Posts on COVID-19 and R: Topics Written About

This post continues the series of analyses of blog posts that address COVID-19 and use R . Here, a heat map shows nine categories that the 160+ blogs address as their primary topic. Assigning each blog post a primary topic introduces a fair amount of subjectivity, to be sure, but the hope is that these broad topics will help researchers find content and colleagues who share similar interests. All the posts and their categories are on my GitHub site in the file “Blog Summary0714.xls”. …

Building on the two previous posts regarding blog posts that address the Covid19 pandemic with R, I identified from the posts mathematical techniques that the bloggers used. The first post describes my project and provides background information about the bloggers, their roles, and their counties; the second post pulls together the frequencies of R packages used in the posts.

The identification of math techniques covered by this post was without a doubt quite subjective. Sometimes the text highlighted the mathematical underpinnings, while other times the our code indicated it.Quite …

As my first write-up explains, my goal in collecting blog posts about Covid19 that use R is to help people who want to analyze coronavirus data and want to do so with R. The motivation for this follow-on article is to look at the R packages used by the bloggers of my ever-growing collection, so that researchers can learn from the code of others.

You can read more about the data set and its history on the first post. It focuses on dates of first publication, the jobs of the bloggers, and the countries where they live. …

Rees Morrison

An enthusiast of the four genre who likes to write (and use R software)

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store